Bear dies after being trapped in hot car while searching for food in Tennessee

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Bear dies after being trapped in hot car while searching for food in Tennessee



♪ SOLEDAD: THE US POWER GRID FACES A STRESS TEST. EXTREME HEAT ACROSS THE COUNTRY IS PURSING A FORCE ON THE POWER NETWORKS THAT POWER OUR LIVES. IN MAY, THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCED $2.5 BILLION TO UPGRADE AND EXPAND THE POWER GRID. BUT THIS IS NOT A QUICK FIX. WITHOUT ADDITIONAL CAPACITY, SERVICE INTERRUPTIONS ARE POSSIBLE, CREATING POTENTIALLY LETHAL SITUATIONS. JIM ROBB IS THE CEO OF NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY CORPORATION, WHICH MONITORS RISKS ON THE GRID. THANK YOU FOR TALKING WITH ME. YOU SAID THE SYSTEM IS VULNERABLE, IN FACT IT IS DANGEROUSLY STRESSED FOR THE LAYPE. WHAT EXACTLY DOES IT MEAN AND HOW DO I GET IT? >> THERE ARE REALLY THREE THINGS AFFECTING RELIABILITY OUTLOOK THIS SUMMER. AND THE FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT IS A REALLY PROBLEMATIC WEATHER FORECAST FOR THE POWER GRID. IT SHOWS HIGH TEMPERATURES OVER MOST OF THE WESTERN TWO-THIRDS OF THE CONTINENT. AND IF YOU PAIR THIS WITH A VERY DRY OUTLOOK, MEANTING CONTINUED DROUGHT CONDITIONS FOR THE WESTERN TWO-THIRDS OF THE CONTINENT, THIS IS JUST A RECIPE FOR DISTRESS ANY POWER SYSTEM. AND OURS HAS BECOME MORE COMPLICATED BECAUSE THE NETWORK ITSELF IS GOING THROUGH A MASSIVE TRANSFORMATION, TOWARDS LOW CARBON RESOURCES LIKE THE ANDARARAR WIND AND WE ARE REMOVING CERTAIN TRADITIONAL GENERATIONS TO WHICH WE ARE USED AND STUDYED AND UNDERSTAND A LOT FOR THE COURSE YEARS. SOELDAD: IS IT GETTING WORSE? >> WE HAVE SEEN A PROGRESSION OF RISIER OUTLOOK FOR THE POWER GRID OVER THE PAST FOUR OR FIVE YEARS. AND PART OF THAT IS DEFINITELY THE WEATHER. THE OTHER PROBLEM GOING ON IS IN THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE NETWORK ITSELF, WE HAVE WHAT WE WILL CALL A MESSLY OLD GENERATION RETIREMENT, GOING ON TOO QUICKLY. SOLEDAD: IS IT DIFFICULT TO MAKE THIS TRANSITION FROM FOSSIL FUELS TO DEPENDENCE ON ANOTHER KIND OF CLEAN ENERGY? >> UNFORTUNATELY, IT’S VERY, VERY COMPLICATED. THE ELECTRICAL GRID IN NORTH AMERICA IS THE BIGGEST AND MOST COMPLICATED MACHINE EVER BUILT. WHAT WE REALLY WANT TO KNOW IS THAT WHEN WE HIT THE LIGHT SWITCH, THE LIGHTS COME ON, THERE IS REALLY A MIRACLE OF ELECTRICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING BEHIND IT. AND THE PROBLEM WE HAVE WITH GRID TRANSITION, ESPECIALLY TOWARDS SOLAR RESOURCES, IS THAT SOLAR RESOURCES DO NOT NATURALLY CREATE ALTERNATING CURRENT OR AC. IT MUST THEREFORE PASS THROUGH A TRANSFORMATION DEVICE CALLED AN INVERTER WHICH SYNCHRONIZES IT WITH THE REST OF THE SYSTEM. AND WE NEED TO ENSURE THAT THESE INVERTERS OPERATE IN A WAY THAT PROMOTES RELIABILITY, SO I’D SAY IT IS DIFFERENT. IT’S NOT BETTER OR WORSE. SOLEDAD: THEREFORE CHECK FOR ME THE BIGGEST SOURCES INVOLVED IN POWERING THE ELECTRICAL NETWORK. >> SO RIGHT NOW THE LARGEST SOURCE OF ENERGY IN THE UNITED STATES IS NATURAL GAS. THIS IS THE GREATEST CAPACITY RESOURCE WE HAVE. IT IS FOLLOWED VERY CLOSELY BY COAL, WHICH IS DOWN QUITE SIGNIFICANTLY. AFTER THAT, IT’S NUCLEAR. AND THEN AFTER WE HAVE WIND, SOLAR AND HYDRO. THEY ARE ALL ABOUT THE SAME AMOUNT. SOLEDAD: HOW TO FIX IT? YOU MUST KEEP THE ELECTRICAL NETWORK RUNNING WHILE YOU ALSO REPAIR THE ELECTRICAL NETWORK AND TRANSITION THE ELECTRICAL NETWORK. SOUNDS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE. >> I THINK ONE OF THE THINGS PEOPLE SOMETIMES LOSE SIGHT IS THAT AN ANY TIME-IN-TIME ELECTRICITY GRID OR ELECTRICITY SECTOR AT ANY TIME MUST FIND WAYS TO BALANCE RELIABILITY, AFFORDABILITY AND ITS IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT. AND I THINK ONE OF THE TIMES WHEN WE HAVE PROBLEMS IS WHEN WE PLACE TOO MUCH EMPHASIS ON ONE OF THESE THREE DIMENSIONS, INSTEAD OF RECOGNIZING THAT THEY MUST ALL BE WORKED AND THINKED IN TANDEM. SO THE WHOLE WORLD IS BECOME SO MORE DEPENDENT ON ELECTRICITY THAT EVEN A MOMENT WITHOUT ELECTRICITY IS A REAL PROBLEM FOR PEOPLE. SOLEDAD: JIM ROBB IS THE CEO OF THE NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC FIABILITY CORPORATIO

A black bear in Sevierville, Tennessee, has died after entering an unlocked car in search of food, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency said in a news release Thursday. Mountains National Park. The owner of a vehicle parked in a rental cabin found the bear inside the car around 6:45 p.m. Wednesday; The car owner said he left the cabin in another vehicle around 10 a.m. Officials believe the bear was able to open the unlocked car with its teeth or paws and became trapped after the door was closed. The bear appeared to be searching for an empty soda can and food wrapper on the ground, the statement added. “The statement said. The agency said people should lock their car doors, roll up the windows, “and never leave food or anything that smells like food inside!” The Bears have a sense of smell seven times stronger than that of a bloodhound, the agency added.This week, dangerous heat set in across the South, with heat alerts for more than 40 million people in Texas to Florida including Dallas, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Mobile and Jacksonville.

A black bear in Sevierville, Tennessee, died after entering an unlocked car in search of food, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency said in a statement Thursday.

Sevierville is about 30 miles from Knoxville in eastern Tennessee, just north of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The owner of a vehicle parked in a rental cabin found the bear inside the car around 6:45 p.m. Wednesday; the car owner said he left the cabin in another vehicle around 10 a.m.

Officials believe the bear was able to open the unlocked car with its teeth or paws and became trapped after the door was closed. The bear appeared to be searching for an empty soda can and food wrapper on the ground, the statement added.

“We believe the heat likely killed the bear as exterior temperatures exceeded 95 degrees yesterday, which means the interior of the vehicle may have reached over 140 degrees,” the statement said.

The agency said people should lock their car doors, open the windows “and never leave food or anything that smells like food inside!”

Bears have a sense of smell seven times stronger than that of a bloodhound, the agency added.

This week, dangerous heat has settled in the South, with heat alerts for more than 40 million people from Texas to Florida, Dallas, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Mobile and Jacksonville.

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